Dr. Andy Lücking

Andy Lücking

Dr. Andy Lücking

Staff member

 

 

 

 

ContactResearch InterestsPublicationsShort Academic CVMiscellaneous

My research interests are centered around linguistic and philosophical theories of meaning and interaction. One focus is on the interplay of speech and gesture in communication. In my work, I combine theoretical modeling and experimental methods. The domains covered range from foundational theoretical aspects of grounding non-verbal meaning to the building of applications. I am concerned with topics such as semantic and pragmatic notions of reference, deferred reference, alignment in dialogue, iconicity, demonstration and exemplification.

Total: 56

2018 (6)

  • R. Gleim, S. Eger, A. Mehler, T. Uslu, W. Hemati, A. Lücking, A. Henlein, S. Kahlsdorf, and A. Hoenen, “Practitioner’s view: A comparison and a survey of lemmatization and morphological tagging in German and Latin,” Journal of Language Modeling, 2018. accepted
    [BibTeX]

    @article{Gleim:Eger:Mehler:2018,
      author    = {Gleim, R\"{u}diger and Eger, Steffen and Mehler, Alexander and Uslu, Tolga and Hemati, Wahed and L\"{u}cking, Andy and Henlein, Alexander and Kahlsdorf, Sven and Hoenen, Armin},
      title     = {Practitioner's view: A comparison and a survey of lemmatization and morphological tagging in German and Latin},
      journal   = {{Journal of Language Modeling}},
      year      = {2018},
      note = {accepted}
    }
  • [https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/495228] A. Lücking, “Witness-loaded and Witness-free Demonstratives,” in Atypical Demonstratives, M. Coniglio, A. Murphy, E. Schlachter, and T. Veenstra, Eds., De Gruyter, 2018.
    [BibTeX]

    @InCollection{Luecking:2018:a,
      author =     {Andy L\"{u}cking},
      title =     {Witness-loaded and Witness-free Demonstratives},
      booktitle =     {Atypical Demonstratives},
      publisher =     {De Gruyter},
      year =     2018,
      editor =     {Marco Coniglio and Andrew Murphy and Eva Schlachter
                      and Tonjes Veenstra},
      isbn =     {978-3-11-056029-9},
     url={https://www.degruyter.com/view/product/495228}
    
    }
  • A. Lücking and J. Ginzburg, “`Most people but not Bill’: integrating sets, individuals and negation into a cognitively plausible account of noun phrase interpretation,” in Proceedings of Cognitive Structures: Linguistic, Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives, 2018.
    [BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Luecking:Ginzburg:2018,
      title =        {`Most people but not {Bill}': integrating sets,
                      individuals and negation into a cognitively
                      plausible account of noun phrase interpretation},
      booktitle =    {Proceedings of Cognitive Structures: Linguistic,
                      Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives},
      series =       {CoSt'18},
      author =       {L\"{u}cking, Andy and Ginzburg, Jonathan},
      year =         2018
    }
  • A. Mehler, W. Hemati, T. Uslu, and A. Lücking, “A Multidimensional Model of Syntactic Dependency Trees for Authorship Attribution,” in Quantitative analysis of dependency structures, J. Jiang and H. Liu, Eds., Berlin/New York: De Gruyter, 2018.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    Abstract: In this chapter we introduce a multidimensional model of syntactic dependency trees. Our ultimate goal is to generate fingerprints of such trees to predict the author of the underlying sentences. The chapter makes a first attempt to create such fingerprints for sentence categorization via the detour of text categorization. We show that at text level, aggregated dependency structures actually provide information about authorship. At the same time, we show that this does not hold for topic detection. We evaluate our model using a quarter of a million sentences collected in two corpora: the first is sampled from literary texts, the second from Wikipedia articles. As a second finding of our approach, we show that quantitative models of dependency structure do not yet allow for detecting syntactic alignment in written communication. We conclude that this is mainly due to effects of lexical alignment on syntactic alignment.
    @InCollection{Mehler:Hemati:Uslu:Luecking:2018,
      Author         = {Alexander Mehler and Wahed Hemati and Tolga Uslu and
                       Andy Lücking},
      Title          = {A Multidimensional Model of Syntactic Dependency Trees
                       for Authorship Attribution},
      BookTitle      = {Quantitative analysis of dependency structures},
      Publisher      = {De Gruyter},
      Editor         = {Jingyang Jiang and Haitao Liu},
      Address        = {Berlin/New York},
      abstract       = {Abstract: In this chapter we introduce a
    multidimensional model of syntactic dependency trees.
    Our ultimate goal is to generate fingerprints of such
    trees to predict the author of the underlying
    sentences. The chapter makes a first attempt to create
    such fingerprints for sentence categorization via the
    detour of text categorization. We show that at text
    level, aggregated dependency structures actually
    provide information about authorship. At the same time,
    we show that this does not hold for topic detection. We
    evaluate our model using a quarter of a million
    sentences collected in two corpora: the first is
    sampled from literary texts, the second from Wikipedia
    articles. As a second finding of our approach, we show
    that quantitative models of dependency structure do not
    yet allow for detecting syntactic alignment in written
    communication. We conclude that this is mainly due to
    effects of lexical alignment on syntactic alignment.},
      keywords       = {Dependency structure, Authorship attribution, Text
                       categorization, Syntactic Alignment},
      year           = 2018
    }
  • [PDF] A. Mehler, R. Gleim, A. Lücking, T. Uslu, and C. Stegbauer, “On the Self-similarity of Wikipedia Talks: a Combined Discourse-analytical and Quantitative Approach,” Glottometrics, vol. 40, pp. 1-44, 2018.
    [BibTeX]

    @Article{Mehler:Gleim:Luecking:Uslu:Stegbauer:2018,
      Author         = {Alexander Mehler and Rüdiger Gleim and Andy Lücking
                       and Tolga Uslu and Christian Stegbauer},
      Title          = {On the Self-similarity of {Wikipedia} Talks: a
                       Combined Discourse-analytical and Quantitative Approach},
      Journal        = {Glottometrics},
      Volume         = {40},
      Pages          = {1-44},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Glottometrics-Mehler.pdf},
      year           = 2018
    }
  • [PDF] P. Helfrich, E. Rieb, G. Abrami, A. Lücking, and A. Mehler, “TreeAnnotator: Versatile Visual Annotation of Hierarchical Text Relations,” in Proceedings of the 11th edition of the Language Resources and Evaluation Conference, May 7 – 12, Miyazaki, Japan, 2018.
    [BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Helfrich:et:al:2018,
      Author         = {Philipp Helfrich and Elias Rieb and Giuseppe Abrami
                       and Andy L{\"u}cking and Alexander Mehler},
      Title          = {TreeAnnotator: Versatile Visual Annotation of
                       Hierarchical Text Relations},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings of the 11th edition of the Language
                       Resources and Evaluation Conference, May 7 - 12},
      Series         = {LREC 2018},
      Address        = {Miyazaki, Japan},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/TreeAnnotator.pdf},
      year           = 2018
    }

2017 (3)

  • [PDF] A. Mehler and A. Lücking, “Modelle sozialer Netzwerke und Natural Language Processing: eine methodologische Randnotiz,” Soziologie, vol. 46, iss. 1, pp. 43-47, 2017.
    [BibTeX]

    @Article{Mehler:Luecking:2017,
      Author         = {Alexander Mehler and Andy Lücking},
      Title          = {Modelle sozialer Netzwerke und Natural Language
                       Processing: eine methodologische Randnotiz},
      Journal        = {Soziologie},
      Volume         = {46},
      Number         = {1},
      Pages          = {43-47},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Soziologe-NetzwerkeundNLP.pdf},
      year           = 2017
    }
  • A. Mehler, O. Zlatkin-Troitschanskaia, W. Hemati, D. Molerov, A. Lücking, and S. Schmidt, “Integrating Computational Linguistic Analysis of Multilingual Learning Data and Educational Measurement Approaches to Explore Student Learning in Higher Education,” in Positive Learning in the Age of Information (PLATO) — A blessing or a curse?, O. Zlatkin-Troitschanskaia, G. Wittum, and A. Dengel, Eds., Wiesbaden: Springer, 2017.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    This chapter develops a computational linguistic model for analyzing and comparing multilingual data as well as its application to a large body of standardized assessment data from higher education. The approach employs both an automatic and a manual annotation of the data on several linguistic layers (including parts of speech, text structure and content). Quantitative features of the textual data are explored that are related to both the students’ (domain-specific knowledge) test results and their level of academic experience. The respective analysis involves statistics of distance correlation, text categorization with respect to text types (questions and distractors) as well as languages (English and German), and network analysis as a means to assess dependencies between features. The results indicate a correlation between correct test results of students and linguistic features of the verbal presentations of tests indicating a language influence on higher education test performance. It is also found that this influence relates to special language. Thus, this integrative modeling approach contributes a test basis for a large-scale analysis of learning data and points to a number of subsequent more detailed research.
    @InCollection{Mehler:Zlatkin-Troitschanskaia:Hemati:Molerov:Luecking:Schmidt:2017,
      Author         = {Alexander Mehler and Olga Zlatkin-Troitschanskaia and
                       Wahed Hemati and Dimitri Molerov and Andy Lücking and
                       Susanne Schmidt},
      Title          = {Integrating Computational Linguistic Analysis of
                       Multilingual Learning Data and Educational Measurement
                       Approaches to Explore Student Learning in Higher
                       Education},
      BookTitle      = {Positive Learning in the Age of Information ({PLATO})
                       -- A blessing or a curse?},
      Publisher      = {Springer},
      Editor         = {Zlatkin-Troitschanskaia, Olga and Wittum, Gabriel and
                       Dengel, Andreas},
      Address        = {Wiesbaden},
      abstract       = {This chapter develops a computational linguistic model
    for analyzing and comparing multilingual data as well
    as its application to a large body of standardized
    assessment data from higher education. The approach
    employs both an automatic and a manual annotation of
    the data on several linguistic layers (including parts
    of speech, text structure and content). Quantitative
    features of the textual data are explored that are
    related to both the students’ (domain-specific
    knowledge) test results and their level of academic
    experience. The respective analysis involves statistics
    of distance correlation, text categorization with
    respect to text types (questions and distractors) as
    well as languages (English and German), and network
    analysis as a means to assess dependencies between
    features. The results indicate a correlation between
    correct test results of students and linguistic
    features of the verbal presentations of tests
    indicating a language influence on higher education
    test performance. It is also found that this influence
    relates to special language. Thus, this integrative
    modeling approach contributes a test basis for a
    large-scale analysis of learning data and points to a
    number of subsequent more detailed research.},
      year           = 2017
    }
  • [PDF] A. Lücking, “Indexicals as Weak Descriptors,” in Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computational Semantics, Montpellier (France), 2017.
    [BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Luecking:2017:c,
      Author         = {L\"{u}cking, Andy},
      Title          = {Indexicals as Weak Descriptors},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on
                       Computational Semantics},
      Series         = {IWCS 2017},
      Address        = {Montpellier (France)},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/descriptive-indexicals_rev.pdf},
      year           = 2017
    }

2016 (3)

  • [PDF] [http://annals-csis.org/Volume_8/drp/83.html] [DOI] A. Lücking, “Modeling Co-Verbal Gesture Perception in Type Theory with Records,” in Proceedings of the 2016 Federated Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems, Gdansk, Poland, 2016, pp. 383-392. Best Paper Award
    [BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Luecking:2016:b,
      Author         = {L\"{u}cking, Andy},
      Title          = {Modeling Co-Verbal Gesture Perception in Type Theory
                       with Records},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings of the 2016 Federated Conference on
                       Computer Science and Information Systems},
      Editor         = {M. Ganzha and L. Maciaszek and M. Paprzycki},
      Volume         = {8},
      Series         = {Annals of Computer Science and Information Systems},
      Pages          = {383-392},
      Address        = {Gdansk, Poland},
      Publisher      = {IEEE},
      Note           = {Best Paper Award},
      doi            = {10.15439/2016F83},
      pdf            = {http://annals-csis.org/Volume_8/pliks/83.pdf},
      url            = {http://annals-csis.org/Volume_8/drp/83.html},
      year           = 2016
    }
  • [PDF] A. Lücking, A. Mehler, D. Walther, M. Mauri, and D. Kurfürst, “Finding Recurrent Features of Image Schema Gestures: the FIGURE corpus,” in Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation, 2016.
    [BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Luecking:Mehler:Walther:Mauri:Kurfuerst:2016,
      Author         = {L\"{u}cking, Andy and Mehler, Alexander and Walther,
                       D\'{e}sir\'{e}e and Mauri, Marcel and Kurf\"{u}rst,
                       Dennis},
      Title          = {Finding Recurrent Features of Image Schema Gestures:
                       the {FIGURE} corpus},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on
                       Language Resources and Evaluation},
      Series         = {LREC 2016},
      location       = {Portoro\v{z} (Slovenia)},
      pdf            = {http://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/lrec2016-gesture-study-final-version-short.pdf},
      year           = 2016
    }
  • [PDF] A. Lücking, A. Hoenen, and A. Mehler, “TGermaCorp — A (Digital) Humanities Resource for (Computational) Linguistics,” in Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation, 2016.
    [BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Luecking:Hoenen:Mehler:2016,
      Author         = {L\"{u}cking, Andy and Hoenen, Armin and Mehler,
                       Alexander},
      Title          = {{TGermaCorp} -- A (Digital) Humanities Resource for
                       (Computational) Linguistics},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on
                       Language Resources and Evaluation},
      Series         = {LREC 2016},
      islrn          = {536-382-801-278-5},
      location       = {Portoro\v{z} (Slovenia)},
      pdf            = {http://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/lrec2016-ttgermacorp-final.pdf},
      year           = 2016
    }

2015 (3)

  • Towards a Theoretical Framework for Analyzing Complex Linguistic Networks, A. Mehler, A. Lücking, S. Banisch, P. Blanchard, and B. Frank-Job, Eds., Springer, 2015.
    [BibTeX]

    @Book{Mehler:Luecking:Banisch:Blanchard:Frank-Job:2015,
      Editor         = {Mehler, Alexander and Lücking, Andy and Banisch, Sven
                       and Blanchard, Philippe and Frank-Job, Barbara},
      Title          = {Towards a Theoretical Framework for Analyzing Complex
                       Linguistic Networks},
      Publisher      = {Springer},
      Series         = {Understanding Complex Systems},
      adress         = {Berlin and New York},
      image          = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/UCS_17-2-tmp.png},
      isbn           = {978-36-662-47237-8},
      year           = 2015
    }
  • A. Mehler and R. Gleim, “Linguistic Networks — An Online Platform for Deriving Collocation Networks from Natural Language Texts,” in Towards a Theoretical Framework for Analyzing Complex Linguistic Networks, A. Mehler, A. Lücking, S. Banisch, P. Blanchard, and B. Frank-Job, Eds., Springer, 2015.
    [BibTeX]

    @InCollection{Mehler:Gleim:2015:a,
      Author         = {Mehler, Alexander and Gleim, Rüdiger},
      Title          = {Linguistic Networks -- An Online Platform for Deriving
                       Collocation Networks from Natural Language Texts},
      BookTitle      = {Towards a Theoretical Framework for Analyzing Complex
                       Linguistic Networks},
      Publisher      = {Springer},
      Editor         = {Mehler, Alexander and Lücking, Andy and Banisch, Sven
                       and Blanchard, Philippe and Frank-Job, Barbara},
      Series         = {Understanding Complex Systems},
      year           = 2015
    }
  • [PDF] [DOI] A. Lücking, T. Pfeiffer, and H. Rieser, “Pointing and Reference Reconsidered,” Journal of Pragmatics, vol. 77, pp. 56-79, 2015.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    Current semantic theory on indexical expressions claims that demonstratively used indexicals such as this lack a referent-determining meaning but instead rely on an accompanying demonstration act like a pointing gesture. While this view allows to set up a sound logic of demonstratives, the direct-referential role assigned to pointing gestures has never been scrutinized thoroughly in semantics or pragmatics. We investigate the semantics and pragmatics of co-verbal pointing from a foundational perspective combining experiments, statistical investigation, computer simulation and theoretical modeling techniques in a novel manner. We evaluate various referential hypotheses with a corpus of object identification games set up in experiments in which body movement tracking techniques have been extensively used to generate precise pointing measurements. Statistical investigation and computer simulations show that especially distal areas in the pointing domain falsify the semantic direct-referential hypotheses concerning pointing gestures. As an alternative, we propose that reference involving pointing rests on a default inference which we specify using the empirical data. These results raise numerous problems for classical semantics–pragmatics interfaces: we argue for pre-semantic pragmatics in order to account for inferential reference in addition to classical post-semantic Gricean pragmatics.
    @Article{Luecking:Pfeiffer:Rieser:2015,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy and Pfeiffer, Thies and Rieser, Hannes},
      Title          = {Pointing and Reference Reconsidered},
      Journal        = {Journal of Pragmatics},
      Volume         = {77},
      Pages          = {56-79},
      abstract       = {Current semantic theory on indexical expressions
    claims that demonstratively used indexicals such as
    this lack a referent-determining meaning but instead
    rely on an accompanying demonstration act like a
    pointing gesture. While this view allows to set up a
    sound logic of demonstratives, the direct-referential
    role assigned to pointing gestures has never been
    scrutinized thoroughly in semantics or pragmatics. We
    investigate the semantics and pragmatics of co-verbal
    pointing from a foundational perspective combining
    experiments, statistical investigation, computer
    simulation and theoretical modeling techniques in a
    novel manner. We evaluate various referential
    hypotheses with a corpus of object identification games
    set up in experiments in which body movement tracking
    techniques have been extensively used to generate
    precise pointing measurements. Statistical
    investigation and computer simulations show that
    especially distal areas in the pointing domain falsify
    the semantic direct-referential hypotheses concerning
    pointing gestures. As an alternative, we propose that
    reference involving pointing rests on a default
    inference which we specify using the empirical data.
    These results raise numerous problems for classical
    semantics–pragmatics interfaces: we argue for
    pre-semantic pragmatics in order to account for
    inferential reference in addition to classical
    post-semantic Gricean pragmatics.},
      doi            = {10.1016/j.pragma.2014.12.013},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Luecking_Pfeiffer_Rieser_Pointing_and_Reference_Reconsiderd.pdf},
      website        = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S037821661500003X},
      year           = 2015
    }

2014 (2)

  • [PDF] A. Mehler, T. vor der Brück, and A. Lücking, “Comparing Hand Gesture Vocabularies for HCI,” in Proceedings of HCI International 2014, 22 – 27 June 2014, Heraklion, Greece, Berlin/New York: Springer, 2014.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    HCI systems are often equipped with gestural interfaces drawing on a predefined set of admitted gestures. We provide an assessment of the fitness of such gesture vocabularies in terms of their learnability and naturalness. This is done by example of rivaling gesture vocabularies of the museum information system WikiNect. In this way, we do not only provide a procedure for evaluating gesture vocabularies, but additionally contribute to design criteria to be followed by the gestures.
    @InCollection{Mehler:vor:der:Brueck:Luecking:2014,
      Author         = {Mehler, Alexander and vor der Brück, Tim and
                       Lücking, Andy},
      Title          = {Comparing Hand Gesture Vocabularies for HCI},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings of HCI International 2014, 22 - 27 June
                       2014, Heraklion, Greece},
      Publisher      = {Springer},
      Address        = {Berlin/New York},
      abstract       = {HCI systems are often equipped with gestural
    interfaces drawing on a predefined set of admitted
    gestures. We provide an assessment of the fitness of
    such gesture vocabularies in terms of their
    learnability and naturalness. This is done by example
    of rivaling gesture vocabularies of the museum
    information system WikiNect. In this way, we do not
    only provide a procedure for evaluating gesture
    vocabularies, but additionally contribute to design
    criteria to be followed by the gestures.},
      keywords       = {wikinect},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Comparing-Gesture-Vocabularies-1_1.pdf},
      website        = {{http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-07230-2_8#page-1}},
      year           = 2014
    }
  • [PDF] [DOI] A. Mehler, A. Lücking, and G. Abrami, “WikiNect: Image Schemata as a Basis of Gestural Writing for Kinetic Museum Wikis,” Universal Access in the Information Society, pp. 1-17, 2014.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    This paper provides a theoretical assessment of gestures in the context of authoring image-related hypertexts by example of the museum information system WikiNect. To this end, a first implementation of gestural writing based on image schemata is provided (Lakoff in Women, fire, and dangerous things: what categories reveal about the mind. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1987). Gestural writing is defined as a sort of coding in which propositions are only expressed by means of gestures. In this respect, it is shown that image schemata allow for bridging between natural language predicates and gestural manifestations. Further, it is demonstrated that gestural writing primarily focuses on the perceptual level of image descriptions (Hollink et al. in Int J Hum Comput Stud 61(5):601–626, 2004). By exploring the metaphorical potential of image schemata, it is finally illustrated how to extend the expressiveness of gestural writing in order to reach the conceptual level of image descriptions. In this context, the paper paves the way for implementing museum information systems like WikiNect as systems of kinetic hypertext authoring based on full-fledged gestural writing.
    @Article{Mehler:Luecking:Abrami:2014,
      Author         = {Mehler, Alexander and Lücking, Andy and Abrami,
                       Giuseppe},
      Title          = {{WikiNect}: Image Schemata as a Basis of Gestural
                       Writing for Kinetic Museum Wikis},
      Journal        = {Universal Access in the Information Society},
      Pages          = {1-17},
      abstract       = {This paper provides a theoretical assessment of
    gestures in the context of authoring image-related
    hypertexts by example of the museum information system
    WikiNect. To this end, a first implementation of
    gestural writing based on image schemata is provided
    (Lakoff in Women, fire, and dangerous things: what
    categories reveal about the mind. University of Chicago
    Press, Chicago, 1987). Gestural writing is defined as a
    sort of coding in which propositions are only expressed
    by means of gestures. In this respect, it is shown that
    image schemata allow for bridging between natural
    language predicates and gestural manifestations.
    Further, it is demonstrated that gestural writing
    primarily focuses on the perceptual level of image
    descriptions (Hollink et al. in Int J Hum Comput Stud
    61(5):601–626, 2004). By exploring the metaphorical
    potential of image schemata, it is finally illustrated
    how to extend the expressiveness of gestural writing in
    order to reach the conceptual level of image
    descriptions. In this context, the paper paves the way
    for implementing museum information systems like
    WikiNect as systems of kinetic hypertext authoring
    based on full-fledged gestural writing.},
      doi            = {10.1007/s10209-014-0386-8},
      issn           = {1615-5289},
      keywords       = {wikinect},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/art_10.1007_s10209-014-0386-8.pdf},
      website        = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10209-014-0386-8},
      year           = 2014
    }

2013 (8)

  • [http://scch2013.wordpress.com/] A. Mehler, A. Lücking, T. vor der Brück, and G. Abrami, WikiNect – A Kinetic Artwork Wiki for Exhibition Visitors, 2013.
    [Poster][BibTeX]

    @Misc{Mehler:Luecking:vor:der:Brueck:2013:a,
      Author         = {Mehler, Alexander and Lücking, Andy and vor der
                       Brück, Tim and Abrami, Giuseppe},
      Title          = {WikiNect - A Kinetic Artwork Wiki for Exhibition
                       Visitors},
      HowPublished   = {Poster Presentation at the Scientific Computing and
                       Cultural Heritage 2013 Conference, Heidelberg},
      keywords       = {wikinect},
      month          = {11},
      poster         = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/SCCHPoster2013.pdf},
      url            = {http://scch2013.wordpress.com/},
      year           = 2013
    }
  • [http://www.bkl-ev.de/bkl_workshop/archiv/workshop13_programm.php] A. Lücking, Theoretische Bausteine für einen semiotischen Ansatz zum Einsatz von Gestik in der Aphasietherapie, 2013.
    [BibTeX]

    @Misc{Luecking:2013:c,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy},
      Title          = {Theoretische Bausteine für einen semiotischen Ansatz
                       zum Einsatz von Gestik in der Aphasietherapie},
      HowPublished   = {Talk at the BKL workshop 2013, Bochum},
      month          = {05},
      url            = {http://www.bkl-ev.de/bkl_workshop/archiv/workshop13_programm.php},
      year           = 2013
    }
  • [http://www.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/phil-lang/investigating/index.html] A. Lücking, Eclectic Semantics for Non-Verbal Signs, 2013.
    [BibTeX]

    @Misc{Luecking:2013:d,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy},
      Title          = {Eclectic Semantics for Non-Verbal Signs},
      HowPublished   = {Talk at the Conference on Investigating semantics:
                       Empirical and philosophical approaches, Bochum},
      month          = {10},
      url            = {http://www.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/phil-lang/investigating/index.html},
      year           = 2013
    }
  • A. Lücking, “Multimodal Propositions? From Semiotic to Semantic Considerations in the Case of Gestural Deictics,” in Poster Abstracts of the Proceedings of the 17th Workshop on the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue, Amsterdam, 2013, pp. 221-223.
    [Poster][BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Luecking:2013:e,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy},
      Title          = {Multimodal Propositions? From Semiotic to Semantic
                       Considerations in the Case of Gestural Deictics},
      BookTitle      = {Poster Abstracts of the Proceedings of the 17th
                       Workshop on the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue},
      Editor         = {Fernandez, Raquel and Isard, Amy},
      Series         = {SemDial 2013},
      Pages          = {221-223},
      Address        = {Amsterdam},
      month          = {12},
      poster         = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/dialdam2013.pdf},
      year           = 2013
    }
  • [PDF] A. Lücking and A. Mehler, “On Three Notions of Grounding of Artificial Dialog Companions,” Science, Technology & Innovation Studies, vol. 10, iss. 1, pp. 31-36, 2013.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    We provide a new, theoretically motivated evaluation                    grid for assessing the conversational achievements of                    Artificial Dialog Companions (ADCs). The grid is                    spanned along three grounding problems. Firstly, it is                    argued that symbol grounding in general has to be                    instrinsic. Current approaches in this context,                    however, are limited to a certain kind of expression                    that can be grounded in this way. Secondly, we identify                    three requirements for conversational grounding, the                    process leading to mutual understanding. Finally, we                    sketch a test case for symbol grounding in the form of                    the philosophical grounding problem that involves the                    use of modal language. Together, the three grounding                    problems provide a grid that allows us to assess                    ADCs’ dialogical performances and to pinpoint future                    developments on these grounds.
    @Article{Luecking:Mehler:2013:a,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy and Mehler, Alexander},
      Title          = {On Three Notions of Grounding of Artificial Dialog
                       Companions},
      Journal        = {Science, Technology \& Innovation Studies},
      Volume         = {10},
      Number         = {1},
      Pages          = {31-36},
      abstract       = {We provide a new, theoretically motivated evaluation
                       grid for assessing the conversational achievements of
                       Artificial Dialog Companions (ADCs). The grid is
                       spanned along three grounding problems. Firstly, it is
                       argued that symbol grounding in general has to be
                       instrinsic. Current approaches in this context,
                       however, are limited to a certain kind of expression
                       that can be grounded in this way. Secondly, we identify
                       three requirements for conversational grounding, the
                       process leading to mutual understanding. Finally, we
                       sketch a test case for symbol grounding in the form of
                       the philosophical grounding problem that involves the
                       use of modal language. Together, the three grounding
                       problems provide a grid that allows us to assess
                       ADCs’ dialogical performances and to pinpoint future
                       developments on these grounds.},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/STI-final-badge.pdf},
      website        = {http://www.sti-studies.de/ojs/index.php/sti/article/view/143},
      year           = 2013
    }
  • A. Lücking, “Interfacing Speech and Co-Verbal Gesture: Exemplification,” in Proceedings of the 35th Annual Conference of the German Linguistic Society, Potsdam, Germany, 2013, pp. 284-286.
    [BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Luecking:2013:b,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy},
      Title          = {Interfacing Speech and Co-Verbal Gesture:
                       Exemplification},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings of the 35th Annual Conference of the
                       German Linguistic Society},
      Series         = {DGfS 2013},
      Pages          = {284-286},
      Address        = {Potsdam, Germany},
      year           = 2013
    }
  • A. Lücking, Ikonische Gesten. Grundzüge einer linguistischen Theorie, Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter, 2013. Zugl. Diss. Univ. Bielefeld (2011)
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    Nicht-verbale Zeichen, insbesondere sprachbegleitende                    Gesten, spielen eine herausragende Rolle in der                    menschlichen Kommunikation. Um eine Analyse von Gestik                    innerhalb derjenigen Disziplinen, die sich mit der                    Erforschung und Modellierung von Dialogen                    beschäftigen, zu ermöglichen, bedarf es einer                    entsprechenden linguistischen Rahmentheorie.                    „Ikonische Gesten“ bietet einen ersten zeichen- und                    wahrnehmungstheoretisch motivierten Rahmen an, in dem                    eine grammatische Analyse der Integration von Sprache                    und Gestik möglich ist. Ausgehend von einem Abriss                    semiotischer Zugänge zu ikonischen Zeichen wird der                    vorherrschende Ähnlichkeitsansatz unter Rückgriff                    auf Wahrnehmungstheorien zugunsten eines                    Exemplifikationsansatzes verworfen. Exemplifikation                    wird im Rahmen einer unifikationsbasierten Grammatik                    umgesetzt. Dort werden u.a. multimodale                    Wohlgeformtheit, Synchronie und multimodale                    Subkategorisierung als neue Gegenstände                    linguistischer Forschung eingeführt und im Rahmen                    einer integrativen Analyse von Sprache und Gestik                    modelliert.
    @Book{Luecking:2013,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy},
      Title          = {Ikonische Gesten. Grundzüge einer linguistischen
                       Theorie},
      Publisher      = {De Gruyter},
      Address        = {Berlin and Boston},
      Note           = {Zugl. Diss. Univ. Bielefeld (2011)},
      abstract       = {Nicht-verbale Zeichen, insbesondere sprachbegleitende
                       Gesten, spielen eine herausragende Rolle in der
                       menschlichen Kommunikation. Um eine Analyse von Gestik
                       innerhalb derjenigen Disziplinen, die sich mit der
                       Erforschung und Modellierung von Dialogen
                       besch{\"a}ftigen, zu ermöglichen, bedarf es einer
                       entsprechenden linguistischen Rahmentheorie.
                       „Ikonische Gesten“ bietet einen ersten zeichen- und
                       wahrnehmungstheoretisch motivierten Rahmen an, in dem
                       eine grammatische Analyse der Integration von Sprache
                       und Gestik möglich ist. Ausgehend von einem Abriss
                       semiotischer Zug{\"a}nge zu ikonischen Zeichen wird der
                       vorherrschende {\"A}hnlichkeitsansatz unter Rückgriff
                       auf Wahrnehmungstheorien zugunsten eines
                       Exemplifikationsansatzes verworfen. Exemplifikation
                       wird im Rahmen einer unifikationsbasierten Grammatik
                       umgesetzt. Dort werden u.a. multimodale
                       Wohlgeformtheit, Synchronie und multimodale
                       Subkategorisierung als neue Gegenst{\"a}nde
                       linguistischer Forschung eingeführt und im Rahmen
                       einer integrativen Analyse von Sprache und Gestik
                       modelliert.},
      image          = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/ikonischeGesten.jpg},
      year           = 2013
    }
  • [PDF] [DOI] A. Lücking, K. Bergman, F. Hahn, S. Kopp, and H. Rieser, “Data-based Analysis of Speech and Gesture: The Bielefeld Speech and Gesture Alignment Corpus (SaGA) and its Applications,” Journal of Multimodal User Interfaces, vol. 7, iss. 1-2, pp. 5-18, 2013.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    Communicating face-to-face, interlocutors frequently                    produce multimodal meaning packages consisting of                    speech and accompanying gestures. We discuss a                    systematically annotated speech and gesture corpus                    consisting of 25 route-and-landmark-description                    dialogues, the Bielefeld Speech and Gesture Alignment                    corpus (SaGA), collected in experimental face-to-face                    settings. We first describe the primary and secondary                    data of the corpus and its reliability assessment. Then                    we go into some of the projects carried out using SaGA                    demonstrating the wide range of its usability: on the                    empirical side, there is work on gesture typology,                    individual and contextual parameters influencing                    gesture production and gestures’ functions for                    dialogue structure. Speech-gesture interfaces have been                    established extending unification-based grammars. In                    addition, the development of a computational model of                    speech-gesture alignment and its implementation                    constitutes a research line we focus on.
    @Article{Luecking:Bergmann:Hahn:Kopp:Rieser:2012,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy and Bergman, Kirsten and Hahn, Florian
                       and Kopp, Stefan and Rieser, Hannes},
      Title          = {Data-based Analysis of Speech and Gesture: The
                       Bielefeld Speech and Gesture Alignment Corpus (SaGA)
                       and its Applications},
      Journal        = {Journal of Multimodal User Interfaces},
      Volume         = {7},
      Number         = {1-2},
      Pages          = {5-18},
      abstract       = {Communicating face-to-face, interlocutors frequently
                       produce multimodal meaning packages consisting of
                       speech and accompanying gestures. We discuss a
                       systematically annotated speech and gesture corpus
                       consisting of 25 route-and-landmark-description
                       dialogues, the Bielefeld Speech and Gesture Alignment
                       corpus (SaGA), collected in experimental face-to-face
                       settings. We first describe the primary and secondary
                       data of the corpus and its reliability assessment. Then
                       we go into some of the projects carried out using SaGA
                       demonstrating the wide range of its usability: on the
                       empirical side, there is work on gesture typology,
                       individual and contextual parameters influencing
                       gesture production and gestures’ functions for
                       dialogue structure. Speech-gesture interfaces have been
                       established extending unification-based grammars. In
                       addition, the development of a computational model of
                       speech-gesture alignment and its implementation
                       constitutes a research line we focus on.},
      doi            = {10.1007/s12193-012-0106-8},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/MMUI-SaGA-revision2.pdf},
      website        = {http://www.springerlink.com/content/a547448u86h3116x/?MUD=MP},
      year           = 2013
    }

2012 (8)

  • [PDF] A. Mehler and A. Lücking, “Pathways of Alignment between Gesture and Speech: Assessing Information Transmission in Multimodal Ensembles,” in Proceedings of the International Workshop on Formal and Computational Approaches to Multimodal Communication under the auspices of ESSLLI 2012, Opole, Poland, 6-10 August, 2012.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    We present an empirical account of multimodal                    ensembles based on Hjelmslev’s notion of selection.                    This is done to get measurable evidence for the                    existence of speech-and-gesture ensembles. Utilizing                    information theory, we show that there is an                    information transmission that makes a gestures’                    representation technique predictable when merely                    knowing its lexical affiliate – in line with the                    notion of the primacy of language. Thus, there is                    evidence for a one-way coupling – going from words to                    gestures – that leads to speech-and-gesture alignment                    and underlies the constitution of multimodal ensembles.
    @InProceedings{Mehler:Luecking:2012:d,
      Author         = {Mehler, Alexander and Lücking, Andy},
      Title          = {Pathways of Alignment between Gesture and Speech:
                       Assessing Information Transmission in Multimodal
                       Ensembles},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings of the International Workshop on Formal
                       and Computational Approaches to Multimodal
                       Communication under the auspices of ESSLLI 2012, Opole,
                       Poland, 6-10 August},
      Editor         = {Gianluca Giorgolo and Katya Alahverdzhieva},
      abstract       = {We present an empirical account of multimodal
                       ensembles based on Hjelmslev’s notion of selection.
                       This is done to get measurable evidence for the
                       existence of speech-and-gesture ensembles. Utilizing
                       information theory, we show that there is an
                       information transmission that makes a gestures’
                       representation technique predictable when merely
                       knowing its lexical affiliate – in line with the
                       notion of the primacy of language. Thus, there is
                       evidence for a one-way coupling – going from words to
                       gestures – that leads to speech-and-gesture alignment
                       and underlies the constitution of multimodal ensembles.},
      keywords       = {wikinect},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Mehler_Luecking_FoCoMC2012-2.pdf},
      website        = {http://www.researchgate.net/publication/268368670_Pathways_of_Alignment_between_Gesture_and_Speech_Assessing_Information_Transmission_in_Multimodal_Ensembles},
      year           = 2012
    }
  • [PDF] A. Lücking, “Towards a Conceptual, Unification-based Speech-Gesture Interface,” in Proceedings of the International Workshop on Formal and Computational Approaches to Multimodal Communication under the auspices of ESSLLI 2012, Opole, Poland, 6-10 August, 2012.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    A framework for grounding the semantics of co-verbal                    iconic gestures is presented. A resemblance account to                    iconicity is discarded in favor of an exemplification                    approach. It is sketched how exemplification can be                    captured within a unification-based grammar that                    provides a conceptual interface. Gestures modeled as                    vector sequences are the exemplificational base. Some                    hypotheses that follow from the general account are                    pointed at and remaining challenges are discussed.
    @InProceedings{Luecking:2012,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy},
      Title          = {Towards a Conceptual, Unification-based Speech-Gesture
                       Interface},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings of the International Workshop on Formal
                       and Computational Approaches to Multimodal
                       Communication under the auspices of ESSLLI 2012, Opole,
                       Poland, 6-10 August},
      Editor         = {Gianluca Giorgolo and Katya Alahverdzhieva},
      abstract       = {A framework for grounding the semantics of co-verbal
                       iconic gestures is presented. A resemblance account to
                       iconicity is discarded in favor of an exemplification
                       approach. It is sketched how exemplification can be
                       captured within a unification-based grammar that
                       provides a conceptual interface. Gestures modeled as
                       vector sequences are the exemplificational base. Some
                       hypotheses that follow from the general account are
                       pointed at and remaining challenges are discussed.},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/FoCoMoC2012-1.pdf},
      year           = 2012
    }
  • [PDF] A. Mehler and A. Lücking, “WikiNect: Towards a Gestural Writing System for Kinetic Museum Wikis,” in Proceedings of the International Workshop On User Experience in e-Learning and Augmented Technologies in Education (UXeLATE 2012) in Conjunction with ACM Multimedia 2012, 29 October- 2 November, Nara, Japan, 2012, pp. 7-12.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    We introduce WikiNect as a kinetic museum information                    system that allows museum visitors to give on-site                    feedback about exhibitions. To this end, WikiNect                    integrates three approaches to Human-Computer                    Interaction (HCI): games with a purpose, wiki-based                    collaborative writing and kinetic text-technologies.                    Our aim is to develop kinetic technologies as a new                    paradigm of HCI. They dispense with classical                    interfaces (e.g., keyboards) in that they build on                    non-contact modes of communication like gestures or                    facial expressions as input displays. In this paper, we                    introduce the notion of gestural writing as a kinetic                    text-technology that underlies WikiNect to enable                    museum visitors to communicate their feedback. The                    basic idea is to explore sequences of gestures that                    share the semantic expressivity of verbally manifested                    speech acts. Our task is to identify such gestures that                    are learnable on-site in the usage scenario of                    WikiNect. This is done by referring to so-called                    transient gestures as part of multimodal ensembles,                    which are candidate gestures of the desired                    functionality. 
    @InProceedings{Mehler:Luecking:2012:c,
      Author         = {Mehler, Alexander and Lücking, Andy},
      Title          = {WikiNect: Towards a Gestural Writing System for
                       Kinetic Museum Wikis},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings of the International Workshop On User
                       Experience in e-Learning and Augmented Technologies in
                       Education (UXeLATE 2012) in Conjunction with ACM
                       Multimedia 2012, 29 October- 2 November, Nara, Japan},
      Pages          = {7-12},
      abstract       = {We introduce WikiNect as a kinetic museum information
                       system that allows museum visitors to give on-site
                       feedback about exhibitions. To this end, WikiNect
                       integrates three approaches to Human-Computer
                       Interaction (HCI): games with a purpose, wiki-based
                       collaborative writing and kinetic text-technologies.
                       Our aim is to develop kinetic technologies as a new
                       paradigm of HCI. They dispense with classical
                       interfaces (e.g., keyboards) in that they build on
                       non-contact modes of communication like gestures or
                       facial expressions as input displays. In this paper, we
                       introduce the notion of gestural writing as a kinetic
                       text-technology that underlies WikiNect to enable
                       museum visitors to communicate their feedback. The
                       basic idea is to explore sequences of gestures that
                       share the semantic expressivity of verbally manifested
                       speech acts. Our task is to identify such gestures that
                       are learnable on-site in the usage scenario of
                       WikiNect. This is done by referring to so-called
                       transient gestures as part of multimodal ensembles,
                       which are candidate gestures of the desired
                       functionality. },
      keywords       = {wikinect},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/UXeLATE2012-copyright.pdf},
      website        = {http://www.researchgate.net/publication/262319200_WikiNect_towards_a_gestural_writing_system_for_kinetic_museum_wikis},
      year           = 2012
    }
  • A. Lücking, S. Ptock, and K. Bergmann, “Assessing Agreement on Segmentations by Means of Staccato, the Segmentation Agreement Calculator according to Thomann,” in Gesture and Sign Language in Human-Computer Interaction and Embodied Communication, E. Efthimiou, G. Kouroupetroglou, and S. Fotina, Eds., Berlin and Heidelberg: Springer, 2012, vol. 7206, pp. 129-138.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    Staccato, the Segmentation Agreement Calculator                    According to Thomann , is a software tool for assessing                    the degree of agreement of multiple segmentations of                    some time-related data (e.g., gesture phases or sign                    language constituents). The software implements an                    assessment procedure developed by Bruno Thomann and                    will be made publicly available. The article discusses                    the rationale of the agreement assessment procedure and                    points at future extensions of Staccato.
    @InCollection{Luecking:Ptock:Bergmann:2012,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy and Ptock, Sebastian and Bergmann,
                       Kirsten},
      Title          = {Assessing Agreement on Segmentations by Means of
                       Staccato, the Segmentation Agreement Calculator
                       according to Thomann},
      BookTitle      = {Gesture and Sign Language in Human-Computer
                       Interaction and Embodied Communication},
      Publisher      = {Springer},
      Editor         = {Eleni Efthimiou and Georgios Kouroupetroglou and
                       Stavroula-Evita Fotina},
      Volume         = {7206},
      Series         = {Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence},
      Pages          = {129-138},
      Address        = {Berlin and Heidelberg},
      abstract       = {Staccato, the Segmentation Agreement Calculator
                       According to Thomann , is a software tool for assessing
                       the degree of agreement of multiple segmentations of
                       some time-related data (e.g., gesture phases or sign
                       language constituents). The software implements an
                       assessment procedure developed by Bruno Thomann and
                       will be made publicly available. The article discusses
                       the rationale of the agreement assessment procedure and
                       points at future extensions of Staccato.},
      booksubtitle   = {9th International Gesture Workshop, GW 2011, Athens,
                       Greece, May 2011, Revised Selected Papers},
      website        = {http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-34182-3_12},
      year           = 2012
    }
  • [DOI] A. Mehler, A. Lücking, and P. Menke, “Assessing Cognitive Alignment in Different Types of Dialog by means of a Network Model,” Neural Networks, vol. 32, pp. 159-164, 2012.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    We present a network model of dialog lexica, called                    TiTAN (Two-layer Time-Aligned Network) series. TiTAN                    series capture the formation and structure of dialog                    lexica in terms of serialized graph representations.                    The dynamic update of TiTAN series is driven by the                    dialog-inherent timing of turn-taking. The model                    provides a link between neural, connectionist                    underpinnings of dialog lexica on the one hand and                    observable symbolic behavior on the other. On the                    neural side, priming and spreading activation are                    modeled in terms of TiTAN networking. On the symbolic                    side, TiTAN series account for cognitive alignment in                    terms of the structural coupling of the linguistic                    representations of dialog partners. This structural                    stance allows us to apply TiTAN in machine learning of                    data of dialogical alignment. In previous studies, it                    has been shown that aligned dialogs can be                    distinguished from non-aligned ones by means of TiTAN                    -based modeling. Now, we simultaneously apply this                    model to two types of dialog: task-oriented,                    experimentally controlled dialogs on the one hand and                    more spontaneous, direction giving dialogs on the                    other. We ask whether it is possible to separate                    aligned dialogs from non-aligned ones in a                    type-crossing way. Starting from a recent experiment                    (Mehler, Lücking, & Menke, 2011a), we show that such                    a type-crossing classification is indeed possible. This                    hints at a structural fingerprint left by alignment in                    networks of linguistic items that are routinely                    co-activated during conversation.
    @Article{Mehler:Luecking:Menke:2012,
      Author         = {Mehler, Alexander and Lücking, Andy and Menke, Peter},
      Title          = {Assessing Cognitive Alignment in Different Types of
                       Dialog by means of a Network Model},
      Journal        = {Neural Networks},
      Volume         = {32},
      Pages          = {159-164},
      abstract       = {We present a network model of dialog lexica, called
                       TiTAN (Two-layer Time-Aligned Network) series. TiTAN
                       series capture the formation and structure of dialog
                       lexica in terms of serialized graph representations.
                       The dynamic update of TiTAN series is driven by the
                       dialog-inherent timing of turn-taking. The model
                       provides a link between neural, connectionist
                       underpinnings of dialog lexica on the one hand and
                       observable symbolic behavior on the other. On the
                       neural side, priming and spreading activation are
                       modeled in terms of TiTAN networking. On the symbolic
                       side, TiTAN series account for cognitive alignment in
                       terms of the structural coupling of the linguistic
                       representations of dialog partners. This structural
                       stance allows us to apply TiTAN in machine learning of
                       data of dialogical alignment. In previous studies, it
                       has been shown that aligned dialogs can be
                       distinguished from non-aligned ones by means of TiTAN
                       -based modeling. Now, we simultaneously apply this
                       model to two types of dialog: task-oriented,
                       experimentally controlled dialogs on the one hand and
                       more spontaneous, direction giving dialogs on the
                       other. We ask whether it is possible to separate
                       aligned dialogs from non-aligned ones in a
                       type-crossing way. Starting from a recent experiment
                       (Mehler, Lücking, \& Menke, 2011a), we show that such
                       a type-crossing classification is indeed possible. This
                       hints at a structural fingerprint left by alignment in
                       networks of linguistic items that are routinely
                       co-activated during conversation.},
      doi            = {10.1016/j.neunet.2012.02.013},
      website        = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0893608012000421},
      year           = 2012
    }
  • A. Lücking and T. Pfeiffer, “Framing Multimodal Technical Communication. With Focal Points in Speech-Gesture-Integration and Gaze Recognition,” in Handbook of Technical Communication, A. Mehler, L. Romary, and D. Gibbon, Eds., De Gruyter Mouton, 2012, vol. 8, pp. 591-644.
    [BibTeX]

    @InCollection{Luecking:Pfeiffer:2012,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy and Pfeiffer, Thies},
      Title          = {Framing Multimodal Technical Communication. With Focal
                       Points in Speech-Gesture-Integration and Gaze
                       Recognition},
      BookTitle      = {Handbook of Technical Communication},
      Publisher      = {De Gruyter Mouton},
      Editor         = {Alexander Mehler and Laurent Romary and Dafydd Gibbon},
      Volume         = {8},
      Series         = {Handbooks of Applied Linguistics},
      Chapter        = {18},
      Pages          = {591-644},
      website        = {http://www.degruyter.com/view/books/9783110224948/9783110224948.591/9783110224948.591.xml},
      year           = 2012
    }
  • P. Kubina, O. Abramov, and A. Lücking, “Barrier-free Communication,” in Handbook of Technical Communication, A. Mehler and L. Romary, Eds., Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter Mouton, 2012, vol. 8, pp. 645-706.
    [BibTeX]

    @InCollection{Kubina:Abramov:Luecking:2012,
      Author         = {Kubina, Petra and Abramov, Olga and Lücking, Andy},
      Title          = {Barrier-free Communication},
      BookTitle      = {Handbook of Technical Communication},
      Publisher      = {De Gruyter Mouton},
      Editor         = {Alexander Mehler and Laurent Romary},
      Volume         = {8},
      Series         = {Handbooks of Applied Linguistics},
      Chapter        = {19},
      Pages          = {645-706},
      Address        = {Berlin and Boston},
      editora        = {Dafydd Gibbon},
      editoratype    = {collaborator},
      website        = {http://www.degruyter.com/view/books/9783110224948/9783110224948.645/9783110224948.645.xml},
      year           = 2012
    }
  • [PDF] [http://kyoto.evolang.org/] A. Lücking and A. Mehler, “What’s the Scope of the Naming Game? Constraints on Semantic Categorization,” in Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on the Evolution of Language, Kyoto, Japan, 2012, pp. 196-203.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    The Naming Game (NG) has become a vivid research                    paradigm for simulation studies on language evolution                    and the establishment of naming conventions. Recently,                    NGs were used for reconstructing the creation of                    linguistic categories, most notably for color terms. We                    recap the functional principle of NGs and the latter                    Categorization Games (CGs) and evaluate them in the                    light of semantic data of linguistic categorization                    outside the domain of colors. This comparison reveals                    two specifics of the CG paradigm: Firstly, the emerging                    categories draw basically on the predefined topology of                    the learning domain. Secondly, the kind of categories                    that can be learnt in CGs is bound to                    context-independent intersective categories. This                    suggests that the NG and the CG focus on a special                    aspect of natural language categorization, which                    disregards context-sensitive categories used in a                    non-compositional manner.
    @InProceedings{Luecking:Mehler:2012,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy and Mehler, Alexander},
      Title          = {What's the Scope of the Naming Game? Constraints on
                       Semantic Categorization},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on the
                       Evolution of Language},
      Pages          = {196-203},
      Address        = {Kyoto, Japan},
      abstract       = {The Naming Game (NG) has become a vivid research
                       paradigm for simulation studies on language evolution
                       and the establishment of naming conventions. Recently,
                       NGs were used for reconstructing the creation of
                       linguistic categories, most notably for color terms. We
                       recap the functional principle of NGs and the latter
                       Categorization Games (CGs) and evaluate them in the
                       light of semantic data of linguistic categorization
                       outside the domain of colors. This comparison reveals
                       two specifics of the CG paradigm: Firstly, the emerging
                       categories draw basically on the predefined topology of
                       the learning domain. Secondly, the kind of categories
                       that can be learnt in CGs is bound to
                       context-independent intersective categories. This
                       suggests that the NG and the CG focus on a special
                       aspect of natural language categorization, which
                       disregards context-sensitive categories used in a
                       non-compositional manner.},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Evolang2012-AL_AM.pdf},
      url            = {http://kyoto.evolang.org/},
      website        = {https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267858061_WHAT'S_THE_SCOPE_OF_THE_NAMING_GAME_CONSTRAINTS_ON_SEMANTIC_CATEGORIZATION},
      year           = 2012
    }

2011 (6)

  • [PDF] A. Lücking and A. Mehler, “A Model of Complexity Levels of Meaning Constitution in Simulation Models of Language Evolution,” International Journal of Signs and Semiotic Systems, vol. 1, iss. 1, pp. 18-38, 2011.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    Currently, some simulative accounts exist within                    dynamic or evolutionary frameworks that are concerned                    with the development of linguistic categories within a                    population of language users. Although these studies                    mostly emphasize that their models are abstract, the                    paradigm categorization domain is preferably that of                    colors. In this paper, the authors argue that color                    adjectives are special predicates in both linguistic                    and metaphysical terms: semantically, they are                    intersective predicates, metaphysically, color                    properties can be empirically reduced onto purely                    physical properties. The restriction of categorization                    simulations to the color paradigm systematically leads                    to ignoring two ubiquitous features of natural language                    predicates, namely relativity and context-dependency.                    Therefore, the models for simulation models of                    linguistic categories are not able to capture the                    formation of categories like perspective-dependent                    predicates ‘left’ and ‘right’, subsective                    predicates like ‘small’ and ‘big’, or                    predicates that make reference to abstract objects like                    ‘I prefer this kind of situation’. The authors                    develop a three-dimensional grid of ascending                    complexity that is partitioned according to the                    semiotic triangle. They also develop a conceptual model                    in the form of a decision grid by means of which the                    complexity level of simulation models of linguistic                    categorization can be assessed in linguistic terms.
    @Article{Luecking:Mehler:2011,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy and Mehler, Alexander},
      Title          = {A Model of Complexity Levels of Meaning Constitution
                       in Simulation Models of Language Evolution},
      Journal        = {International Journal of Signs and Semiotic Systems},
      Volume         = {1},
      Number         = {1},
      Pages          = {18-38},
      abstract       = {Currently, some simulative accounts exist within
                       dynamic or evolutionary frameworks that are concerned
                       with the development of linguistic categories within a
                       population of language users. Although these studies
                       mostly emphasize that their models are abstract, the
                       paradigm categorization domain is preferably that of
                       colors. In this paper, the authors argue that color
                       adjectives are special predicates in both linguistic
                       and metaphysical terms: semantically, they are
                       intersective predicates, metaphysically, color
                       properties can be empirically reduced onto purely
                       physical properties. The restriction of categorization
                       simulations to the color paradigm systematically leads
                       to ignoring two ubiquitous features of natural language
                       predicates, namely relativity and context-dependency.
                       Therefore, the models for simulation models of
                       linguistic categories are not able to capture the
                       formation of categories like perspective-dependent
                       predicates ‘left’ and ‘right’, subsective
                       predicates like ‘small’ and ‘big’, or
                       predicates that make reference to abstract objects like
                       ‘I prefer this kind of situation’. The authors
                       develop a three-dimensional grid of ascending
                       complexity that is partitioned according to the
                       semiotic triangle. They also develop a conceptual model
                       in the form of a decision grid by means of which the
                       complexity level of simulation models of linguistic
                       categorization can be assessed in linguistic terms.},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/luecking_mehler_article_IJSSS.pdf},
      year           = 2011
    }
  • [PDF] A. Lücking, S. Ptock, and K. Bergmann, “Staccato: Segmentation Agreement Calculator,” in Gesture in Embodied Communication and Human-Computer Interaction. Proceedings of the 9th International Gesture Workshop, Athens, Greece, 2011, pp. 50-53.
    [BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Luecking:Ptock:Bergmann:2011,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy and Ptock, Sebastian and Bergmann,
                       Kirsten},
      Title          = {Staccato: Segmentation Agreement Calculator},
      BookTitle      = {Gesture in Embodied Communication and Human-Computer
                       Interaction. Proceedings of the 9th International
                       Gesture Workshop},
      Editor         = {Eleni Efthimiou and Georgios Kouroupetroglou},
      Series         = {GW 2011},
      Pages          = {50--53},
      Address        = {Athens, Greece},
      Publisher      = {National and Kapodistrian University of Athens},
      month          = {5},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/LueckingEA_final.pdf},
      year           = 2011
    }
  • [PDF] A. Mehler and A. Lücking, “A Graph Model of Alignment in Multilog,” in Proceedings of IEEE Africon 2011, Zambia, 2011.
    [BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Mehler:Luecking:2011,
      Author         = {Mehler, Alexander and Lücking, Andy},
      Title          = {A Graph Model of Alignment in Multilog},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings of IEEE Africon 2011},
      Series         = {IEEE Africon},
      Address        = {Zambia},
      Organization   = {IEEE},
      month          = {9},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/africon2011-paper-Alexander_Mehler_Andy_Luecking.pdf},
      website        = {https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267941012_A_Graph_Model_of_Alignment_in_Multilog},
      year           = 2011
    }
  • [PDF] A. Mehler, A. Lücking, and P. Menke, “From Neural Activation to Symbolic Alignment: A Network-Based Approach to the Formation of Dialogue Lexica,” in Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN 2011), San Jose, California, July 31 — August 5, 2011.
    [BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Mehler:Luecking:Menke:2011,
      Author         = {Mehler, Alexander and Lücking, Andy and Menke, Peter},
      Title          = {From Neural Activation to Symbolic Alignment: A
                       Network-Based Approach to the Formation of Dialogue
                       Lexica},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on
                       Neural Networks (IJCNN 2011), San Jose, California,
                       July 31 -- August 5},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/neural-align-final.pdf},
      website        = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/IJCNN.2011.6033266}},
      year           = 2011
    }
  • [PDF] A. Lücking, O. Abramov, A. Mehler, and P. Menke, “The Bielefeld Jigsaw Map Game (JMG) Corpus,” in Abstracts of the Corpus Linguistics Conference 2011, Birmingham, 2011.
    [BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Luecking:Abramov:Mehler:Menke:2011,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy and Abramov, Olga and Mehler, Alexander
                       and Menke, Peter},
      Title          = {The Bielefeld Jigsaw Map Game (JMG) Corpus},
      BookTitle      = {Abstracts of the Corpus Linguistics Conference 2011},
      Series         = {CL2011},
      Address        = {Birmingham},
      pdf            = {http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/documents/college-artslaw/corpus/conference-archives/2011/Paper-137.pdf},
      website        = {http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/corpus/publications/conference-archives/2011-birmingham.aspx},
      year           = 2011
    }
  • [PDF] A. Mehler, A. Lücking, and P. Menke, “Assessing Lexical Alignment in Spontaneous Direction Dialogue Data by Means of a Lexicon Network Model,” in Proceedings of 12th International Conference on Intelligent Text Processing and Computational Linguistics (CICLing), February 20–26, Tokyo, Berlin/New York, 2011, pp. 368-379.
    [BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Mehler:Luecking:Menke:2011:a,
      Author         = {Mehler, Alexander and Lücking, Andy and Menke, Peter},
      Title          = {Assessing Lexical Alignment in Spontaneous Direction
                       Dialogue Data by Means of a Lexicon Network Model},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings of 12th International Conference on
                       Intelligent Text Processing and Computational
                       Linguistics (CICLing), February 20--26, Tokyo},
      Series         = {CICLing'11},
      Pages          = {368-379},
      Address        = {Berlin/New York},
      Publisher      = {Springer},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/titan-cicling-camera-ready.pdf},
      website        = {http://www.springerlink.com/content/g7p2250025u20010/},
      year           = 2011
    }

2010 (5)

  • [PDF] [DOI] A. Mehler, A. Lücking, and P. Weiß, “A Network Model of Interpersonal Alignment,” Entropy, vol. 12, iss. 6, pp. 1440-1483, 2010.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    In dyadic communication, both interlocutors adapt to                    each other linguistically, that is, they align                    interpersonally. In this article, we develop a                    framework for modeling interpersonal alignment in terms                    of the structural similarity of the interlocutors’                    dialog lexica. This is done by means of so-called                    two-layer time-aligned network series, that is, a                    time-adjusted graph model. The graph model is                    partitioned into two layers, so that the                    interlocutors’ lexica are captured as subgraphs of an                    encompassing dialog graph. Each constituent network of                    the series is updated utterance-wise. Thus, both the                    inherent bipartition of dyadic conversations and their                    gradual development are modeled. The notion of                    alignment is then operationalized within a quantitative                    model of structure formation based on the mutual                    information of the subgraphs that represent the                    interlocutor’s dialog lexica. By adapting and further                    developing several models of complex network theory, we                    show that dialog lexica evolve as a novel class of                    graphs that have not been considered before in the area                    of complex (linguistic) networks. Additionally, we show                    that our framework allows for classifying dialogs                    according to their alignment status. To the best of our                    knowledge, this is the first approach to measuring                    alignment in communication that explores the                    similarities of graph-like cognitive representations.
    @Article{Mehler:Weiss:Luecking:2010:a,
      Author         = {Mehler, Alexander and Lücking, Andy and Wei{\ss},
                       Petra},
      Title          = {A Network Model of Interpersonal Alignment},
      Journal        = {Entropy},
      Volume         = {12},
      Number         = {6},
      Pages          = {1440-1483},
      abstract       = {In dyadic communication, both interlocutors adapt to
                       each other linguistically, that is, they align
                       interpersonally. In this article, we develop a
                       framework for modeling interpersonal alignment in terms
                       of the structural similarity of the interlocutors’
                       dialog lexica. This is done by means of so-called
                       two-layer time-aligned network series, that is, a
                       time-adjusted graph model. The graph model is
                       partitioned into two layers, so that the
                       interlocutors’ lexica are captured as subgraphs of an
                       encompassing dialog graph. Each constituent network of
                       the series is updated utterance-wise. Thus, both the
                       inherent bipartition of dyadic conversations and their
                       gradual development are modeled. The notion of
                       alignment is then operationalized within a quantitative
                       model of structure formation based on the mutual
                       information of the subgraphs that represent the
                       interlocutor’s dialog lexica. By adapting and further
                       developing several models of complex network theory, we
                       show that dialog lexica evolve as a novel class of
                       graphs that have not been considered before in the area
                       of complex (linguistic) networks. Additionally, we show
                       that our framework allows for classifying dialogs
                       according to their alignment status. To the best of our
                       knowledge, this is the first approach to measuring
                       alignment in communication that explores the
                       similarities of graph-like cognitive representations.},
      doi            = {10.3390/e12061440},
      pdf            = {http://www.mdpi.com/1099-4300/12/6/1440/pdf},
      website        = {http://www.mdpi.com/1099-4300/12/6/1440/},
      year           = 2010
    }
  • A. Lücking and K. Bergmann, Introducing the Bielefeld SaGA CorpusEuropa Universität Viadrina Frankfurt/Oder: , 2010.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    People communicate multimodally. Most prominently,                    they co-produce speech and gesture. How do they do                    that? Studying the interplay of both modalities has to                    be informed by empirically observed communication                    behavior. We present a corpus built of speech and                    gesture data gained in a controlled study. We describe                    1) the setting underlying the data; 2) annotation of                    the data; 3) reliability evalution methods and results;                    and 4) applications of the corpus in the research                    domain of speech and gesture alignment.
    @Misc{Luecking:Bergmann:2010,
      Author         = {Andy L\"{u}cking and Kirsten Bergmann},
      Title          = {Introducing the {B}ielefeld {SaGA} Corpus},
      HowPublished   = {Talk given at \textit{Gesture: Evolution, Brain, and
                       Linguistic Structures.} 4th Conference of the
                       International Society for Gesture Studies (ISGS).
                       Europa Universit\"{a}t Viadrina Frankfurt/Oder},
      abstract       = {People communicate multimodally. Most prominently,
                       they co-produce speech and gesture. How do they do
                       that? Studying the interplay of both modalities has to
                       be informed by empirically observed communication
                       behavior. We present a corpus built of speech and
                       gesture data gained in a controlled study. We describe
                       1) the setting underlying the data; 2) annotation of
                       the data; 3) reliability evalution methods and results;
                       and 4) applications of the corpus in the research
                       domain of speech and gesture alignment.},
      address        = {Europa Universit{\"a}t Viadrina Frankfurt/Oder},
      day            = {28},
      month          = {07},
      year           = 2010
    }
  • [PDF] A. Lücking, “A Semantic Account for Iconic Gestures,” in Gesture: Evolution, Brain, and Linguistic Structures, Europa Universität Viadrina Frankfurt/Oder, 2010, p. 210.
    [BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Luecking:2010,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy},
      Title          = {A Semantic Account for Iconic Gestures},
      BookTitle      = {Gesture: Evolution, Brain, and Linguistic Structures},
      Pages          = {210},
      Address        = {Europa Universit{\"a}t Viadrina Frankfurt/Oder},
      Organization   = {4th Conference of the International Society for
                       Gesture Studies (ISGS)},
      keywords       = {own},
      month          = {7},
      pdf            = {https://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/download/2318565/2319962},
      website        = {http://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/publication/2318565},
      year           = 2010
    }
  • [PDF] A. Lücking, K. Bergmann, F. Hahn, S. Kopp, and H. Rieser, “The Bielefeld Speech and Gesture Alignment Corpus (SaGA),” in Multimodal Corpora: Advances in Capturing, Coding and Analyzing Multimodality, Malta, 2010, pp. 92-98.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    People communicate multimodally. Most prominently,                    they co-produce speech and gesture. How do they do                    that? Studying the interplay of both modalities has to                    be informed by empirically observed communication                    behavior. We present a corpus built of speech and                    gesture data gained in a controlled study. We describe                    1) the setting underlying the data; 2) annotation of                    the data; 3) reliability evalution methods and results;                    and 4) applications of the corpus in the research                    domain of speech and gesture alignment.
    @InProceedings{Luecking:et:al:2010,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy and Bergmann, Kirsten and Hahn, Florian
                       and Kopp, Stefan and Rieser, Hannes},
      Title          = {The Bielefeld Speech and Gesture Alignment Corpus
                       (SaGA)},
      BookTitle      = {Multimodal Corpora: Advances in Capturing, Coding and
                       Analyzing Multimodality},
      Pages          = {92--98},
      Address        = {Malta},
      Organization   = {7th International Conference for Language Resources
                       and Evaluation (LREC 2010)},
      abstract       = {People communicate multimodally. Most prominently,
                       they co-produce speech and gesture. How do they do
                       that? Studying the interplay of both modalities has to
                       be informed by empirically observed communication
                       behavior. We present a corpus built of speech and
                       gesture data gained in a controlled study. We describe
                       1) the setting underlying the data; 2) annotation of
                       the data; 3) reliability evalution methods and results;
                       and 4) applications of the corpus in the research
                       domain of speech and gesture alignment.},
      keywords       = {own},
      month          = {5},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/saga-corpus.pdf},
      website        = {http://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/publication/2001935},
      year           = 2010
    }
  • [PDF] A. Mehler, P. Weiß, P. Menke, and A. Lücking, “Towards a Simulation Model of Dialogical Alignment,” in Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on the Evolution of Language (Evolang8), 14-17 April 2010, Utrecht, 2010, pp. 238-245.
    [BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Mehler:Weiss:Menke:Luecking:2010,
      Author         = {Mehler, Alexander and Wei{\ss}, Petra and Menke, Peter
                       and Lücking, Andy},
      Title          = {Towards a Simulation Model of Dialogical Alignment},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on the
                       Evolution of Language (Evolang8), 14-17 April 2010,
                       Utrecht},
      Pages          = {238-245},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Alexander_Mehler_Petra_Weiss_Peter_Menke_Andy_Luecking.pdf},
      website        = {http://www.let.uu.nl/evolang2010.nl/},
      year           = 2010
    }

2009 (1)

  • [PDF] A. Mehler and A. Lücking, “A Structural Model of Semiotic Alignment: The Classification of Multimodal Ensembles as a Novel Machine Learning Task,” in Proceedings of IEEE Africon 2009, September 23-25, Nairobi, Kenya, 2009.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    In addition to the well-known linguistic alignment                    processes in dyadic communication – e.g., phonetic,                    syntactic, semantic alignment – we provide evidence                    for a genuine multimodal alignment process, namely                    semiotic alignment. Communicative elements from                    different modalities 'routinize into' cross-modal                    'super-signs', which we call multimodal ensembles.                    Computational models of human communication are in need                    of expressive models of multimodal ensembles. In this                    paper, we exemplify semiotic alignment by means of                    empirical examples of the building of multimodal                    ensembles. We then propose a graph model of multimodal                    dialogue that is expressive enough to capture                    multimodal ensembles. In line with this model, we                    define a novel task in machine learning with the aim of                    training classifiers that can detect semiotic alignment                    in dialogue. This model is in support of approaches                    which need to gain insights into realistic                    human-machine communication.
    @InProceedings{Mehler:Luecking:2009,
      Author         = {Mehler, Alexander and Lücking, Andy},
      Title          = {A Structural Model of Semiotic Alignment: The
                       Classification of Multimodal Ensembles as a Novel
                       Machine Learning Task},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings of IEEE Africon 2009, September 23-25,
                       Nairobi, Kenya},
      Publisher      = {IEEE},
      abstract       = {In addition to the well-known linguistic alignment
                       processes in dyadic communication – e.g., phonetic,
                       syntactic, semantic alignment – we provide evidence
                       for a genuine multimodal alignment process, namely
                       semiotic alignment. Communicative elements from
                       different modalities 'routinize into' cross-modal
                       'super-signs', which we call multimodal ensembles.
                       Computational models of human communication are in need
                       of expressive models of multimodal ensembles. In this
                       paper, we exemplify semiotic alignment by means of
                       empirical examples of the building of multimodal
                       ensembles. We then propose a graph model of multimodal
                       dialogue that is expressive enough to capture
                       multimodal ensembles. In line with this model, we
                       define a novel task in machine learning with the aim of
                       training classifiers that can detect semiotic alignment
                       in dialogue. This model is in support of approaches
                       which need to gain insights into realistic
                       human-machine communication.},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/mehler_luecking_2009.pdf},
      website        = {http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/freeabs_all.jsp?reload=true&arnumber=5308098},
      year           = 2009
    }

2008 (1)

  • [PDF] A. Lücking, A. Mehler, and P. Menke, “Taking Fingerprints of Speech-and-Gesture Ensembles: Approaching Empirical Evidence of Intrapersonal Alignment in Multimodal Communication,” in LONDIAL 2008: Proceedings of the 12th Workshop on the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue (SEMDIAL), King’s College London, 2008, p. 157–164.
    [BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Luecking:Mehler:Menke:2008,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy and Mehler, Alexander and Menke, Peter},
      Title          = {Taking Fingerprints of Speech-and-Gesture Ensembles:
                       Approaching Empirical Evidence of Intrapersonal
                       Alignment in Multimodal Communication},
      BookTitle      = {LONDIAL 2008: Proceedings of the 12th Workshop on the
                       Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue (SEMDIAL)},
      Pages          = {157–164},
      Address        = {King's College London},
      month          = {June 2–4},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/luecking_mehler_menke_2008.pdf},
      website        = {https://www.researchgate.net/publication/237305375_Taking_Fingerprints_of_Speech-and-Gesture_Ensembles_Approaching_Empirical_Evidence_of_Intrapersonal_Alignment_in_Multimodal_Communication},
      year           = 2008
    }

2007 (2)

  • [PDF] [http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00455-007-9078-3] [DOI] C. Borr, M. Hielscher-Fastabend, and A. Lücking, “Reliability and Validity of Cervical Auscultation,” Dysphagia, vol. 22, pp. 225-234, 2007.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    We conducted a two-part study that contributes to the                    discussion about cervical auscultation (CA) as a                    scientifically justifiable and medically useful tool to                    identify patients with a high risk of                    aspiration/penetration. We sought to determine (1)                    acoustic features that mark a deglutition act as                    dysphagic; (2) acoustic changes in healthy older                    deglutition profiles compared with those of younger                    adults; (3) the correctness and concordance of rater                    judgments based on CA; and (4) if education in CA                    improves individual reliability. The first part of the                    study focused on a comparison of the swallow morphology                    of dysphagic as opposed to healthy subjects�                    deglutition in terms of structure properties of the                    pharyngeal phase of deglutition. We obtained the                    following results. The duration of deglutition apnea is                    significantly higher in the older group than in the                    younger one. Comparing the younger group and the                    dysphagic group we found significant differences in                    duration of deglutition apnea, onset time, and number                    of gulps. Just one parameter, number of gulps,                    distinguishes significantly between the older and the                    dysphagic groups. The second part of the study aimed at                    evaluating the reliability of CA in detecting dysphagia                    measured as the concordance and the correctness of CA                    experts in classifying swallowing sounds. The                    interrater reliability coefficient AC1 resulted in a                    value of 0.46, which is to be interpreted as fair                    agreement. Furthermore, we found that comparison with                    radiologically defined aspiration/penetration for the                    group of experts (speech and language therapists)                    yielded 70% specificity and 94% sensitivity. We                    conclude that the swallowing sounds contain audible                    cues that should, in principle, permit reliable                    classification and view CA as an early warning system                    for identifying patients with a high risk of                    aspiration/penetration; however, it is not appropriate                    as a stand-alone tool.
    @Article{Borr:Luecking:Hierlscher:2007,
      Author         = {Borr, Christiane and Hielscher-Fastabend, Martina and
                       Lücking, Andy},
      Title          = {Reliability and Validity of Cervical Auscultation},
      Journal        = {Dysphagia},
      Volume         = {22},
      Pages          = {225--234},
      abstract       = {We conducted a two-part study that contributes to the
                       discussion about cervical auscultation (CA) as a
                       scientifically justifiable and medically useful tool to
                       identify patients with a high risk of
                       aspiration/penetration. We sought to determine (1)
                       acoustic features that mark a deglutition act as
                       dysphagic; (2) acoustic changes in healthy older
                       deglutition profiles compared with those of younger
                       adults; (3) the correctness and concordance of rater
                       judgments based on CA; and (4) if education in CA
                       improves individual reliability. The first part of the
                       study focused on a comparison of the swallow morphology
                       of dysphagic as opposed to healthy subjects�
                       deglutition in terms of structure properties of the
                       pharyngeal phase of deglutition. We obtained the
                       following results. The duration of deglutition apnea is
                       significantly higher in the older group than in the
                       younger one. Comparing the younger group and the
                       dysphagic group we found significant differences in
                       duration of deglutition apnea, onset time, and number
                       of gulps. Just one parameter, number of gulps,
                       distinguishes significantly between the older and the
                       dysphagic groups. The second part of the study aimed at
                       evaluating the reliability of CA in detecting dysphagia
                       measured as the concordance and the correctness of CA
                       experts in classifying swallowing sounds. The
                       interrater reliability coefficient AC1 resulted in a
                       value of 0.46, which is to be interpreted as fair
                       agreement. Furthermore, we found that comparison with
                       radiologically defined aspiration/penetration for the
                       group of experts (speech and language therapists)
                       yielded 70% specificity and 94% sensitivity. We
                       conclude that the swallowing sounds contain audible
                       cues that should, in principle, permit reliable
                       classification and view CA as an early warning system
                       for identifying patients with a high risk of
                       aspiration/penetration; however, it is not appropriate
                       as a stand-alone tool.},
      doi            = {10.1007/s00455-007-9078-3},
      issue          = {3},
      pdf            = {http://www.shkim.eu/cborr/ca5manuscript.pdf},
      publisher      = {Springer New York},
      url            = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00455-007-9078-3},
      website        = {http://www.springerlink.com/content/c45578u74r38m4v7/},
      year           = 2007
    }
  • A. Kranstedt, A. Lücking, T. Pfeiffer, H. Rieser, and M. Staudacher, Locating Objects by Pointing, 2007.
    [BibTeX]

    @Misc{Kranstedt:et:al:2007,
      Author         = {Kranstedt, Alfred and Lücking, Andy and Pfeiffer,
                       Thies and Rieser, Hannes and Staudacher, Marc},
      Title          = {Locating Objects by Pointing},
      HowPublished   = {3rd International Conference of the International
                       Society for Gesture Studies. Evanston, IL, USA},
      keywords       = {own},
      month          = {6},
      year           = 2007
    }

2006 (6)

  • [PDF] A. Kranstedt, A. Lücking, T. Pfeiffer, H. Rieser, and M. Staudacher, “Measuring and Reconstructing Pointing in Visual Contexts,” in brandial ’06 — Proceedings of the 10th Workshop on the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue, Potsdam, 2006, pp. 82-89.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    We describe an experiment to gather original data on                    geometrical aspects of pointing. In particular, we are                    focusing upon the concept of the pointing cone, a                    geometrical model of a pointing’s extension. In our                    setting we employed methodological and technical                    procedures of a new type to integrate data from                    annotations as well as from tracker recordings. We                    combined exact information on position and orientation                    with rater’s classifications. Our first results seem                    to challenge classical linguistic and philosophical                    theories of demonstration in that they advise to                    separate pointings from reference.
    @InProceedings{Kranstedt:et:al:2006:c,
      Author         = {Kranstedt, Alfred and Lücking, Andy and Pfeiffer,
                       Thies and Rieser, Hannes and Staudacher, Marc},
      Title          = {Measuring and Reconstructing Pointing in Visual
                       Contexts},
      BookTitle      = {brandial '06 -- Proceedings of the 10th Workshop on
                       the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue},
      Editor         = {David Schlangen and Raquel Fernández},
      Pages          = {82--89},
      Address        = {Potsdam},
      Publisher      = {Universit{\"a}tsverlag Potsdam},
      abstract       = {We describe an experiment to gather original data on
                       geometrical aspects of pointing. In particular, we are
                       focusing upon the concept of the pointing cone, a
                       geometrical model of a pointing’s extension. In our
                       setting we employed methodological and technical
                       procedures of a new type to integrate data from
                       annotations as well as from tracker recordings. We
                       combined exact information on position and orientation
                       with rater’s classifications. Our first results seem
                       to challenge classical linguistic and philosophical
                       theories of demonstration in that they advise to
                       separate pointings from reference.},
      keywords       = {own},
      month          = {9},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/measure.pdf},
      website        = {http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.144.8472},
      year           = 2006
    }
  • [PDF] A. Lücking, H. Rieser, and M. Staudacher, “Multi-modal Integration for Gesture and Speech,” in brandial ’06 — Proceedings of the 10th Workshop on the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue, Potsdam, 2006, pp. 106-113.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    Demonstratives, in particular gestures that 'only'                    accompany speech, are not a big issue in current                    theories of grammar. If we deal with gestures, fixing                    their function is one big problem, the other one is how                    to integrate the representations originating from                    different channels and, ultimately, how to determine                    their composite meanings. The growing interest in                    multi-modal settings, computer simulations,                    human-machine interfaces and VR-applications increases                    the need for theories of multi-modal structures and                    events. In our workshop-contribution we focus on the                    integration of multi-modal contents and investigate                    different approaches dealing with this problem such as                    Johnston et al. (1997) and Johnston (1998), Johnston                    and Bangalore (2000), Chierchia (1995), Asher (2005),                    and Rieser (2005).
    @InProceedings{Luecking:Rieser:Staudacher:2006:a,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy and Rieser, Hannes and Staudacher, Marc},
      Title          = {Multi-modal Integration for Gesture and Speech},
      BookTitle      = {brandial '06 -- Proceedings of the 10th Workshop on
                       the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue},
      Editor         = {David Schlangen and Raquel Fernández},
      Pages          = {106--113},
      Address        = {Potsdam},
      Publisher      = {Universit{\"a}tsverlag Potsdam},
      abstract       = {Demonstratives, in particular gestures that 'only'
                       accompany speech, are not a big issue in current
                       theories of grammar. If we deal with gestures, fixing
                       their function is one big problem, the other one is how
                       to integrate the representations originating from
                       different channels and, ultimately, how to determine
                       their composite meanings. The growing interest in
                       multi-modal settings, computer simulations,
                       human-machine interfaces and VR-applications increases
                       the need for theories of multi-modal structures and
                       events. In our workshop-contribution we focus on the
                       integration of multi-modal contents and investigate
                       different approaches dealing with this problem such as
                       Johnston et al. (1997) and Johnston (1998), Johnston
                       and Bangalore (2000), Chierchia (1995), Asher (2005),
                       and Rieser (2005).},
      keywords       = {own},
      month          = {9},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/mm-int-brandial-final.pdf},
      year           = 2006
    }
  • A. Kranstedt, A. Lücking, T. Pfeiffer, H. Rieser, and I. Wachsmuth, “Deictic Object Reference in Task-oriented Dialogue,” in Situated Communication, G. Rickheit and I. Wachsmuth, Eds., Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton, 2006, pp. 155-207.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    This chapter presents an original approach towards a                    detailed understanding of the usage of pointing                    gestures accompanying referring expressions. This                    effort is undertaken in the context of human-machine                    interaction integrating empirical studies, theory of                    grammar and logics, and simulation techniques. In                    particular, we take steps to classify the role of                    pointing in deictic expressions and to model the                    focussed area of pointing gestures, the so-called                    pointing cone. This pointing cone serves as a central                    concept in a formal account of multi-modal integration                    at the linguistic speech-gesture interface as well as                    in a computational model of processing multi-modal                    deictic expressions.
    @InCollection{Kranstedt:et:al:2006:b,
      Author         = {Kranstedt, Alfred and Lücking, Andy and Pfeiffer,
                       Thies and Rieser, Hannes and Wachsmuth, Ipke},
      Title          = {Deictic Object Reference in Task-oriented Dialogue},
      BookTitle      = {Situated Communication},
      Publisher      = {De Gruyter Mouton},
      Editor         = {Gert Rickheit and Ipke Wachsmuth},
      Pages          = {155--207},
      Address        = {Berlin},
      abstract       = {This chapter presents an original approach towards a
                       detailed understanding of the usage of pointing
                       gestures accompanying referring expressions. This
                       effort is undertaken in the context of human-machine
                       interaction integrating empirical studies, theory of
                       grammar and logics, and simulation techniques. In
                       particular, we take steps to classify the role of
                       pointing in deictic expressions and to model the
                       focussed area of pointing gestures, the so-called
                       pointing cone. This pointing cone serves as a central
                       concept in a formal account of multi-modal integration
                       at the linguistic speech-gesture interface as well as
                       in a computational model of processing multi-modal
                       deictic expressions.},
      keywords       = {own},
      website        = {http://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/publication/1894485},
      year           = 2006
    }
  • A. Kranstedt, A. Lücking, T. Pfeiffer, H. Rieser, and I. Wachsmuth, “Deixis: How to Determine Demonstrated Objects Using a Pointing Cone,” in Gesture in Human-Computer Interaction and Simulation, S. Gibet, N. Courty, and J. Kamp, Eds., Berlin: Springer, 2006, pp. 300-311.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    We present a collaborative approach towards a detailed                    understanding of the usage of pointing gestures                    accompanying referring expressions. This effort is                    undertaken in the context of human-machine interaction                    integrating empirical studies, theory of grammar and                    logics, and simulation techniques. In particular, we                    attempt to measure the precision of the focussed area                    of a pointing gesture, the so-called pointing cone. The                    pointing cone serves as a central concept in a formal                    account of multi-modal integration at the linguistic                    speech-gesture interface as well as in a computational                    model of processing multi-modal deictic expressions.
    @InCollection{Kranstedt:et:al:2006:a,
      Author         = {Kranstedt, Alfred and Lücking, Andy and Pfeiffer,
                       Thies and Rieser, Hannes and Wachsmuth, Ipke},
      Title          = {Deixis: How to Determine Demonstrated Objects Using a
                       Pointing Cone},
      BookTitle      = {Gesture in Human-Computer Interaction and Simulation},
      Publisher      = {Springer},
      Editor         = {Sylvie Gibet and Nicolas Courty and Jean-Francois Kamp},
      Pages          = {300--311},
      Address        = {Berlin},
      abstract       = {We present a collaborative approach towards a detailed
                       understanding of the usage of pointing gestures
                       accompanying referring expressions. This effort is
                       undertaken in the context of human-machine interaction
                       integrating empirical studies, theory of grammar and
                       logics, and simulation techniques. In particular, we
                       attempt to measure the precision of the focussed area
                       of a pointing gesture, the so-called pointing cone. The
                       pointing cone serves as a central concept in a formal
                       account of multi-modal integration at the linguistic
                       speech-gesture interface as well as in a computational
                       model of processing multi-modal deictic expressions.},
      anote          = {6th International Gesture Workshop, Berder Island,
                       France, 2005, Revised Selected Papers},
      keywords       = {own},
      website        = {http://www.springerlink.com/content/712036hp5v2q8408/},
      year           = 2006
    }
  • [PDF] T. Pfeiffer, A. Kranstedt, and A. Lücking, “Sprach-Gestik Experimente mit IADE, dem Interactive Augmented Data Explorer,” in Proceedings: Dritter Workshop Virtuelle und Erweiterte Realität der GI-Fachgruppe VR/AR, Koblenz, 2006.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    Für die empirische Erforschung natürlicher                    menschlicher Kommunikation sind wir auf die Akquise und                    Auswertung umfangreicher Daten angewiesen. Die                    Modalitäten, über die sich Menschen ausdrücken                    können, sind sehr unterschiedlich - und genauso                    verschieden sind die Repräsentationen, mit denen                    sie für die Empirie verfügbar gemacht werden können.                    Für eine Untersuchung des Zeigeverhaltens bei der                    Referenzierung von Objekten haben wir mit IADE ein                    Framework für die Aufzeichnung, Analyse und                    Resimulation von Sprach-Gestik Daten entwickelt. Mit                    dessen Hilfe können wir für unsere Forschung                    entscheidende Fortschritte in der linguistischen                    Experimentalmethodik machen.
    @InProceedings{Pfeiffer:Kranstedt:Luecking:2006,
      Author         = {Pfeiffer, Thies and Kranstedt, Alfred and Lücking,
                       Andy},
      Title          = {Sprach-Gestik Experimente mit IADE, dem Interactive
                       Augmented Data Explorer},
      BookTitle      = {Proceedings: Dritter Workshop Virtuelle und Erweiterte
                       Realit{\"a}t der GI-Fachgruppe VR/AR},
      Address        = {Koblenz},
      abstract       = {Für die empirische Erforschung natürlicher
                       menschlicher Kommunikation sind wir auf die Akquise und
                       Auswertung umfangreicher Daten angewiesen. Die
                       Modalit{\"a}ten, über die sich Menschen ausdrücken
                       können, sind sehr unterschiedlich - und genauso
                       verschieden sind die Repr{\"a}sentationen, mit denen
                       sie für die Empirie verfügbar gemacht werden können.
                       Für eine Untersuchung des Zeigeverhaltens bei der
                       Referenzierung von Objekten haben wir mit IADE ein
                       Framework für die Aufzeichnung, Analyse und
                       Resimulation von Sprach-Gestik Daten entwickelt. Mit
                       dessen Hilfe können wir für unsere Forschung
                       entscheidende Fortschritte in der linguistischen
                       Experimentalmethodik machen.},
      keywords       = {own},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Pfeiffer-Kranstedt-Luecking-IADE.pdf},
      website        = {http://pub.uni-bielefeld.de/publication/2426853},
      year           = 2006
    }
  • [PDF] A. Lücking, H. Rieser, and M. Staudacher, “SDRT and Multi-modal Situated Communication,” in brandial ’06 — Proceedings of the 10th Workshop on the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue, 2006, pp. 72-79.
    [BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Luecking:Rieser:Stauchdacher:2006:b,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy and Rieser, Hannes and Staudacher, Marc},
      Title          = {SDRT and Multi-modal Situated Communication},
      BookTitle      = {brandial '06 -- Proceedings of the 10th Workshop on
                       the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue},
      Editor         = {David Schlangen and Raquel Fernández},
      Pages          = {72--79},
      Publisher      = {Universit{\"a}tsverlag Potsdam},
      keywords       = {own},
      month          = {9},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/sdrt-sitcomm-brandial-final.pdf},
      year           = 2006
    }

2004 (1)

  • [PDF] A. Lücking, H. Rieser, and J. Stegmann, “Statistical Support for the Study of Structures in Multi-Modal Dialogue: Inter-Rater Agreement and Synchronization,” in Catalog ’04—Proceedings of the Eighth Workshop on the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue, Barcelona, 2004, pp. 56-63.
    [Abstract] [BibTeX]

    We present a statistical approach to assess relations                    that hold among speech and pointing gestures in and                    between turns in task-oriented dialogue. The units                    quantified over are the time-stamps of the XML-based                    annotation of the digital video data. It was found                    that, on average, gesture strokes do not exceed, but                    are freely distributed over the time span of their                    linguistic affiliates. Further, the onset of the                    affiliate was observed to occur earlier than gesture                    initiation. Moreover, we found that gestures do obey                    certain appropriateness conditions and contribute                    semantic content ('gestures save words') as well.                    Gestures also seem to play a functional role wrt                    dialogue structure: There is evidence that gestures can                    contribute to the bundle of features making up a                    turn-taking signal. Some statistical results support a                    partitioning of the domain, which is also reflected in                    certain rating difficulties. However, our evaluation of                    the applied annotation scheme generally resulted in                    very good agreement
    @InProceedings{Luecking:Rieser:Stegmann:2004,
      Author         = {Lücking, Andy and Rieser, Hannes and Stegmann, Jens},
      Title          = {Statistical Support for the Study of Structures in
                       Multi-Modal Dialogue: Inter-Rater Agreement and
                       Synchronization},
      BookTitle      = {Catalog '04---Proceedings of the Eighth Workshop on
                       the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue},
      Editor         = {Jonathan Ginzburg and Enric Vallduví},
      Pages          = {56--63},
      Address        = {Barcelona},
      Organization   = {Department of Translation and Philology, Universitat
                       Pompeu Fabra},
      abstract       = {We present a statistical approach to assess relations
                       that hold among speech and pointing gestures in and
                       between turns in task-oriented dialogue. The units
                       quantified over are the time-stamps of the XML-based
                       annotation of the digital video data. It was found
                       that, on average, gesture strokes do not exceed, but
                       are freely distributed over the time span of their
                       linguistic affiliates. Further, the onset of the
                       affiliate was observed to occur earlier than gesture
                       initiation. Moreover, we found that gestures do obey
                       certain appropriateness conditions and contribute
                       semantic content ('gestures save words') as well.
                       Gestures also seem to play a functional role wrt
                       dialogue structure: There is evidence that gestures can
                       contribute to the bundle of features making up a
                       turn-taking signal. Some statistical results support a
                       partitioning of the domain, which is also reflected in
                       certain rating difficulties. However, our evaluation of
                       the applied annotation scheme generally resulted in
                       very good agreement},
      keywords       = {own},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/08-lucking-etal.pdf},
      year           = 2004
    }
  • [PDF] V. Ries and A. Lücking, ,” in Multilingual Resources and Multilingual Applications: Proceedings of the German Society for Computational Linguistics 2011, , pp. 207-210.
    [Poster][BibTeX]

    @InProceedings{Ries:Luecking:2011,
      Author         = {Ries, Veronika and Lücking, Andy},
      BookTitle      = {Multilingual Resources and Multilingual Applications:
                       Proceedings of the German Society for Computational
                       Linguistics 2011},
      Pages          = {207--210},
      pdf            = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Ries_Luecking.pdf},
      poster         = {https://www.texttechnologylab.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/SoSaBiEC-poster.pdf}
    }


Since January 2011, I am a research assistant at the Text Technology Lab at the Goethe University Frankfurt.

I studied linguistics, philosophy and German philology at Bielefeld University. During my studies, I worked as scientific assistant in several projects:

  1. B1 “Speech-Gesture Alignment” in the Collaborative Research Center 673 “Alignment in Communication” (June 2006 to January 2011). In this project, I contributed in building the Speech-and-Gesture Alignment Corpus (SaGA). I also developed an account for the meaning of co-verbal iconic gestures and how they interact with speech (see dissertation.).
  2. Linguistic Networks (September 2009 to December 2010).
  3. Research Unit 437 “Text Technological Modelling of Information”, project A2 Secondary structuring of information and comparative analysis of discourse (Sekimo) (April 2006 to September 2006). In this short-term engagement, I supported the annotation of discourse structure and centering relations, and the assessment of reliability.
  4. Project B3 “Deixis in Construction Dialogues” of the Collaborative Research Center 360 “Situated Artificial Communicators” (2005). In this project, I participated in investigating the role of pointing in demonstrative reference in task-oriented dialogue.

In 2011, I received my PhD in linguistics at Bielefeld University for my prolegomena for a linguistic theory of co-verbal iconic gesture. The work has been published in 2013 as “Ikonische Gesten. Grundzüge einer linguistischen Theorie”.

I am a member of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Sprachwissenschaft (DGfS).

Besides my research activities, I am interested in typesetting with LaTeX. I am a member of the German TeX User Society (Deutsche Anwendervereinigung TeX, DANTE).